An Episcopal-Muslim?

Chuck Colson’s “Breakpoint” has an excellent article on a woman in Seattle who has converted to Islam, while at the same time serving as an Episcopal priest. She sees not conflict in the two.

From Breakpoint:
On Friday nights, Ann Holmes Redding of Seattle puts on a black head scarf, heads to the Al-Islam Center, and prays with her fellow Muslims.

Nothing I just told you is remarkable. What’s remarkable is what I didn’t tell you: Redding is an Episcopal priest. Not an ex-Episcopal priest, mind you, but a priest, as far as she and her superiors are concerned, in good standing.

Her story is a vivid reminder of what’s really at stake in the various culture wars within Christian churches: orthodoxy.

Redding has been a priest for over 20 years. Until recently she was the director of “faith formation” at Seattle’s Episcopal cathedral, St. Mark’s. I am, as Dave Barry likes to say, not making this up. more

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7 thoughts on “An Episcopal-Muslim?

  1. What I find interesting is that while half the recognized “Christian” pastors in America consider the Bible to be almost entirely allegorical, reject the divinity of Christ, and have reduced most of Christianity to mere “good advice,” the largely biblically literalist Mormons are the ones being tagged “un-Christian.”

    Hmmm.

    There must be something else going on here.

  2. half the recognized “Christian” pastors in America consider the Bible to be almost entirely allegorical, reject the divinity of Christ, and have reduced most of Christianity to mere “good advice,”

    That’s an impressive statistic there, Seth. What’s your source for that?

  3. Just read this article in our newspaper on Sunday. I don’t see how she can call herself remotely a Christian.

  4. No, it’s not impressive Kullervo. It’s just sloppy writing. “Half” was meant to mean lots – enough pastors to notice a real trend. That’s really all I meant. The word “half” was probably misleading and shouldn’t have been used.

  5. Fair enough. I certainly get the impression that liberal Christian theology has often fostered attitudes and ideas about Christ that are so far from Orthodox that they are no longer really recognizable as Christianity anymore.

    But I certainly don’t think that pastors with that approach represent half of all pastors. Rather, I think that seriously liberal theology only represents a very small fraction of American Christianity.

    But then, I grew up in the South, so my experience might be skewed a bit…

    At the same time, I know that it’s usually the mainline denominations that are accused of being not Christian enough, but my personal experience with them doesn’t necessarily track with that idea.

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