How Denominations See One Another

This is brilliant. I particularly like how each see themselves.

You can see a larger version here.

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43 thoughts on “How Denominations See One Another

  1. I just like that there’s a picture of snake-handlers.

    I still have been meaning to put up a post of my own about snake-handling.

  2. If I were adding an LDS column to the chart, I’d have a picture of a devil to show the evangelical perspective on Mormons and an anti-gay or no-on-8 sign to show the liberal perspective. I don’t know about the others. There’d have to be a picture of missionaries in there somewhere.

    And as to the LDS perspective, the Catholic square would have a picture of Mary and the evangelical might be some anti-Mormon dude outside of Temple Square. I’m not sure about the others, as most Mormons wouldn’t distinguish at all between them and evangelicals.

    Oh, and for how the LDS view themselves, I’d probably show a picture of a clean-cut white family with lots of kids.

  3. Agree with Eric! I wanted to share this on FB, but realized none of my LDS friends would have a clue about the differences between the denominations, except for Catholic and evangelical.

  4. I’ve been thinking since I wrote my original comment, and for those who know a little bit about the differences (and Katie and I agree that’s a distinct minority), Mormons might picture the charismatics as a TV preacher driving a fancy car, the Reformed as throngs of people at the gates of hell and the mainliners as a gay couple or (if they’re charitable) a female preacher.

  5. Tim sees Mormonism as a young man (the Father) with a wife by his side.

    NON SEQUITUR BURN!

    everyone is going to burn except those of the orthodox cult, eh?

    DOUBLE NON SEQUITUR BURN.

    Cal, I award you the Todd Wood Award for Excellence in Cryptic, Veiled and Baffling Comments.

  6. Cal, I award you the Todd Wood Award for Excellence in Cryptic, Veiled and Baffling Comments.

    I honestly have no idea what he was getting at with the first comment. I don’t think Cal could really explain it.

    Eric said:
    the Reformed as throngs of people at the gates of hell
    Funny. Is this because Mormons HATE the idea of predestination or because they think Reformers love the idea of hell?

  7. There really isn’t much need to speculate. For those who went through the temple pre-1990, there was already a presentation as to what the Mormon view of other churches was. It had something to do with this guy:

  8. The former. I’d say that agency (or, to use the Protestant term, free will) is a central tenet of Mormonism.

  9. Oops. That last comment of mine was directed at Tim’s question:

    Is this because Mormons HATE the idea of predestination or because they think Reformers love the idea of hell?

  10. As a side-note, I think that Mormons are probably not a very good judge of how other groups of Christians view Mormons.

    Same goes for everyone else too though. How Evangelicals view Catholics is probably not the same as how Catholics think Evangelicals view Catholics.

  11. Agree with Eric! I wanted to share this on FB, but realized none of my LDS friends would have a clue about the differences between the denominations, except for Catholic and evangelical.

    For the record, Liberals, Evangelicals, Reformed and Charismatics are not denominations; they’re trans-denominational movements/currents.

  12. I get all of the pictures except the evangelical view of Reformed? Whats up with the Beer? I never considered evangelicals as teetotalers. Or am I missing the point?

  13. As a side-note, I think that Mormons are probably not a very good judge of how other groups of Christians view Mormons. Same goes for everyone else too though.

    Undoubtedly.

    I was going to say something profound in response, but I’m still laughing at the award you gave Cal. (I couldn’t figure out what he meant either.)

  14. Yes, Evangelicals are scandalized by drinking. At least they used to be, those sensibilities are disappearing.

  15. I assume that where that where that picture comes from (and if I’m wrong Tim can correct me) is that traditionally evangelicals (not all, but many) have encouraged (or even, in some cases, required of church members) abstinence from alcohol. Many of the traditionally evangelical denominations still do. When I attended an evangelical college in the ’70s, it was every bit as dry as Brigham Young University is today, and that was not uncommon in the evangelical world. I honestly didn’t know until I went to college (OK, I was a bit naive) that there were Christians who didn’t frown on even responsible alcohol consumption.

    However, many in the modern Reformed movement don’t take that position. In fact, much has been written about, for example, how Mark Driscoll’s church in Seattle sponsors beer-brewing instruction in its men’s groups. That open acceptance of alcohol (along with Driscoll’s use of rough language in sermons) has been criticized by some evangelical leaders. I suspect it’s that sort of thing that led to the artist using that picture.

  16. I never thought of the Reformed as being particularly known for drinking. Old School Presbyterians were considered “wets” because they did not support total abstinence. The argument being that it is clearly not taught in the Bible. Otherwise you would be forced to excommunicate Jesus for turning water into wine. I guess I just always thought that alcohol wasn’t an issue unless you made it one. Plus hefeweizen is to good to be wrong?

    The mainline Presbyterians (North and South) supported Prohibition, albeit with the objection of a substantial minority of mostly Old School types. I am aware that Baptists, fundamentalists, and some Methodists and other denominations members abstain from all drinking. I have just never connected no drinking with American evangelicalism. But then I have always thought of Mark Driscoll as an evangelical and not all that Reformed.

  17. Nope, that’s back in the south where I went to seminary. I don’t get into the rattlesnake hibernaculum in the lava outside my town and snatch some to incorporate in weekly worship. My veiled statements fail me. But what if sometime (minus the rods), I select a snake, and you select a snake, and we had a showdown like what took place in ancient times between Moses and Pharoah’s priests?

  18. The cube of perspectives is really good.

    Have any of you guys or gals seen the movie “Baptists at our Barbecue”? It’s a cute, clean comedy/romance taking place in a town of 262 Baptists & 262 Mormons. You won’t believe this, but they have troubles getting along with each other.
    You’d all get a kick out of it. The main characters are Mormon & I doubt there’s anything in it that would offend a Mormon or an evangelical.

  19. Cal, that has almost nothing to do with the original post or the comments that have gone before you.

    I hereby commission the Cal Apropos of Nothing Award for Excellence in Non Sequiturs. I will be awarding it in your name in the future.

  20. David Clark said, “There really isn’t much need to speculate. For those who went through the temple pre-1990, there was already a presentation as to what the Mormon view of other churches was. It had something to do with this guy. . . .”

    Who is that guy? You?
    The temple script underwent positive changes around 1990. I’m glad you pointed that out, David!

    Thanks for the awards, guys. Accept my bows.
    Have you seen the movie or not? I thought you guys were experts on LDS/evangelical relations.

  21. See, charismatics are led by the Spirit. We are free-spirited. That’s why we take bunny trails like Paul the Apostle did in his writings. That’s why it’s hard for me to stick to Tim’s program. 🙂

  22. Who is that guy? You?
    The temple script underwent positive changes around 1990. I’m glad you pointed that out, David!

    Cal,

    That’s not me. If you know “the temple script underwent positive changes in 1990”, but you don’t know who that guy is, then you need to do a little more research.

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