The Future

I think this guy gives us a glimpse at the future of Mormonism due to the recent publication of Church essays on Mormon history. It won’t come quickly, easily or without consequence, but it will come.

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About Tim

Evangelical Christian living in Southern California. I live with my wife and whatever foster children happen to be in our home at this moment. I love photography, baseball, movies and I'm fascinated by Mormonism.

13 thoughts on “The Future

  1. He can sure talk.

    He’s seems very real and sincere. If what he wants will help to keep young people in the Mormon religion, then I have to say that I hope it does not happen.

  2. He is barking up the wrong tree. The roots of all of the “controversy” is the fact that Mormons don’t have a doctrinal way of keeping Joseph Smith in the celestial kingdom.

    They need a Gospel that allows them to refer to Joseph Smith as a run-of-the-mill saved person.

    Is that possible?

    What is the least painful doctrinal move they can make in a situation when a lot of people’s faith in God rests in their faith that Joseph Smith was of God?

  3. “What is the least painful doctrinal move they can make in a situation when a lot of people’s faith in God rests in their faith that Joseph Smith was of God?”

    Seems this is a strategic question that undermines any notion of the truth of God.

  4. The roots of all of the “controversy” is the fact that Mormons don’t have a doctrinal way of keeping Joseph Smith in the celestial kingdom.

    Come again?

  5. It seems to me that controversy about Joseph’s polygamy is that the average first or second generation Mormon has no easy way of considering conduct like Joseph’s Smith’s as making him eligible for celestial glory.

  6. Seems this is a strategic question that undermines any notion of the truth of God.

    Well, I see most theology as strategic questions. You might have to explain more why it undermines the truth of God.

  7. They need a Gospel that allows them to refer to Joseph Smith as a run-of-the-mill saved person.

    I think strategically this is spot on. It would simultaneously reduce the “hero worship” or “pedestal creation” that dominates Mormon culture in regards to Smith and General Authorities AND refocus the focus of the church on a grace that everyone needs (including a revered prophet).

    I don’t know that it can happen but it would be more successful for the Church long term. The video’s proposal will likely be a disaster for the church the first time it is tried. Long-term things would start to solidify as Mormons and the LDS church would become comfortable being a niche religion, but it won’t go well at first.

  8. Jared, because a religion of truth should not have to worry about how to frame its founder. Truth is truth, and what is presented is a matter of marketing to alter perception of what many view as the reason for their faith. Altering that object/person is to alter the truth of Mormonism.

  9. It seems to me that controversy about Joseph’s polygamy is that the average first or second generation Mormon has no easy way of considering conduct like Joseph’s Smith’s as making him eligible for celestial glory.

    The suffering and death of Jesus are what make someone eligible for celestial glory, not the person’s actions. That’s as true for Joseph Smith as it is for me and you. If there’s “no easy way” to see that, it’s only because Smith has been put on a pedestal as high as the Tower of Babel was supposed to be.

  10. If there’s “no easy way” to see that, it’s only because Smith has been put on a pedestal as high as the Tower of Babel was supposed to be.

    And of course using the passive voice only shows how deep the problem runs; in attempting to identify the problem you inadvertently fall into it. Joseph Smith put himself on that pedestal and the LDS church maintained him on that pedestal. There is no need for “has been put”, the agents are all readily identifiable here.

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